Why You Should Be Calculating Arrow Weight?

Calculating Arrow Weight

The first question that comes to mind when buying a bow, is what draw weight do I need? This is an important question for beginners and experienced hunters alike. In the following article, you will find out how to calculate arrow weight and why it’s necessary for your bow setup.


All bows have a minimum draw weight rating, which is the minimum amount of force required to fully draw the bowstring back. However, it can be dangerous for a shooter to use a bow with too high a draw weight rating because it may lead to serious injuries. On top of that, using a high draw weight bow could also result in inaccuracy as heavy arrows tend to fly slower than those with low mass.


It’s also important to know that the exact draw weight of a bow can vary slightly depending on numerous factors such as humidity and elevation. This means that it cannot be guaranteed that your selected bow will shoot an arrow with exactly 55 lbs of force for example, even if you did select X-55 as the draw weight.

How To Calculate Arrow Weight?

The first step is to find out the exact specifications of your arrows which includes measurements such as shaft diameter and point weight. Then you need to know exactly how much each of these components weighs. You should also check whether or not bolts are included in the total shaft weight or if they are measured separately.


Typically bolts will be shorter than arrows so their combined weight won’t usually make too big of a difference but it does affect total arrow mass either way. Once all measurements have been found, you can use the following formula to find out how much your arrows weigh:


Arrow weight (grains)= Arrow length (inches) X Shaft diameter(inches) + shaft wall thickness X shaft density + head weight + point weight.


This is of course a theoretical calculation that cannot tell you for sure how fast your particular arrow shoots. It’s also important to remember that it assumes a standard atmosphere and gravity level. Things such as humidity and elevation will affect the outcome of this calculation more than any other factor so always take this into consideration when selecting an appropriate draw weight range for your bow setup.

Calculating arrow weight is therefore an important part of the bow shopping process. By knowing how much your arrows weigh, you can find out which draw weight range your bow will be able to handle most accurately.


You should keep in mind that draw weight is not equal to arrow speed or kinetic energy, so don’t assume for example that a 55 lbs bow will shoot arrows at least as fast as 55 fps. Arrow weight does have a direct effect on both speed and kinetic energy though, so there is definitely a relationship between these metrics.


Always remember that even if you are using the same bow setup with the same archer, arrow speeds can vary depending on many factors including which type of arrow shaft+point combination was selected by the shooter.

Therefore, if you are serious about your bowhunting, it’s absolutely crucial that you learn how to calculate arrow weight. This will allow you to select the best setup for your current conditions and needs.

Are Heavier arrows more accurate?

Yes, because heavier arrows tend to fly slower than lighter ones. This makes it easier to predict the arrow’s trajectory and thus more accurate as well. This also means that higher draw weight bows can shoot arrows with a lower total mass at the same speed as those with lower draw weights.


The opposite is true for those using low draw weight bows; they will need to use arrows with a relatively high total mass and/or shoot very slowly and carefully to achieve greater accuracy. Remember that too light or too heavy of an arrow can both affect your bow’s performance negatively so always take this into consideration when selecting the appropriate setup for your needs.


If you want accuracy over pure speed, choose a lower draw weight bow and lighter arrows instead of vice versa. When selecting a weight range, you should also take into consideration what kind of game you want to hunt. For large and dangerous animals such as bears, choosing a heavier setup with higher draw weights is usually preferable since it gives you more stopping power in case the animal gets too close.


It’s always better to be safe than sorry when dealing with extremely dangerous wild beasts. On the other hand, smaller games such as deer can be effectively hunted even with a light bow and arrows so this time going for a lower draw weight range may be the wiser choice. Just remember that all bows are different and no matter how much knowledge or experience you have in archery, there will always be an element of luck involved whenever you try to shoot something. Staying within the recommended draw weight range for your setup is always paramount to achieving great results with consistency.

Aluminum Vs Carbon Arrows

How To Select Arrows For Your Setup?

The first step is of course to select the best fitting arrow length that has been previously calculated according to desired performance requirements. This can be done by measuring an arrow of known specifications or looking for the mark of a well-reputed manufacturer on its shaft.


Once you have chosen an appropriate length, it’s time to look at arrow weights. If you are using a bow with lower draw weight, choose lighter arrows so they fly faster, therefore, becoming more forgiving in case you make any accuracy mistakes during shooting practice. On the other hand, heavier setups work great even with somewhat slow arrows so here your best choice will be to use arrows with the heaviest possible weight.


You should also take into consideration the arrow’s shaft wall thickness. The thicker this part of the shaft is, the heavier it can safely get without affecting accuracy too much (provided that everything else about your setup remains constant).

If you shoot with a bow that has low draw weight and/or shoots relatively slowly for your preferences, using fairly heavy arrows is an option although not required since lighter projectiles might actually make up for slower speed and still be sufficient. Finally, there’s also head weight and point weight which both affect how quickly your arrow shoots but only if they are below certain limits.

Using anything above what is recommended can actually result in reduced performance so always try to stay within the recommended range unless you are willing to sacrifice some power for the sake of increased flight speed. Since this is a somewhat complicated yet very important topic, it may be required to do more research on how all specs work together since you don’t want your arrows flying way off target and penetrating deeper than intended!


Always take any recommendations from experienced archers into consideration and you should end up with perfectly accurate results that will leave your prey dead or wounded in no time.

How does arrow weight affect speed?

Arrows are often lighter than the corresponding draw weight would suggest due to advances in bow design that allow for faster shooting. As a result, power stroke has been extended which also means that arrow speed doesn’t necessarily depend on draw weight alone and this can be confusing. Although it is true that having a stiffer riser decreases arrow speed, it’s still advisable to use arrows with lower weights because they also increase accuracy and can even work better with fast bows if correctly tuned through proper spine selection.

The difference between a heavy and a lightweight arrow is less significant in compound bows due to their stiffer riser which makes spine selection easier. However, because of the longer power stroke especially when going for higher draw weights, differences between arrow weights can be noticeable after shooting a few groups. Maximum arrow speeds are usually achieved around 28 inches of draw length although the exact rate might depend on bow type and weight as well as shooter’s strength and skillful use of bow accessories such as stabilizers.


What is the most important factor in determining bow weight?

The most important factor which determines bow weight is the draw weight – this remains true for both compound and recurve bows. This can be further broken down into static and kinetic draw weights since it’s useful to know how much power you are pulling in terms of either pushing or pulling your limbs back during the rest position.


Bow mass, on the other hand, does not interfere with speed at all so there’s no reason to choose a heavier one just because it might provide more momentum than lighter alternatives. However, choosing too light of a bow could result in reduced stability which will probably lower accuracy over time due to muscle fatigue if you don’t manage to set up any support systems that improve your shooting posture All things considered, selecting an appropriate bow weight will largely depend on personal preferences but also on your chosen activity.

For example, most hunters prefer to use lighter bows due to the fact that they are more maneuverable in the woods and can track games easier with them. On the other hand, archers aiming for somewhat longer ranges might benefit greatly from heavier draw weights since it enables them to shoot at higher speeds which leads directly to increased arrow speed and therefore increased kinetic energy delivered upon impact.

How does draw length affect arrow weight?

There is an optimal range of arrow weights that you should be using if you want your setup to work as intended without reducing its performance or accuracy along the way. These values are based on your draw length since it is important that both ends of the bow work harmoniously.


For example, a bow that’s too short for a shooter with 24 inches of draw length might end up having a stiff riser which will result in uncomfortable shooting and reduced accuracy. On the other hand, a bow that has been custom-crafted especially for someone with 26 inches of the draw is going to be far too weak for them because arrows will likely fall short of their intended target or even fly off course.


To avoid all these problems you should choose an appropriate arrow weight based on your own preferences but also based on the specifications of whichever bow you have decided to purchase. In most cases, 50 lbs are recommended as a starting point since it works by default without any adjustments whereas powerful bows may require at least 10 lbs more to work properly.


How does the arrow spine affect speed and accuracy?

Arrow spine is a major factor that affects both arrow speed and accuracy because it can make or break your setup if it’s not tuned properly beforehand. Like any other component, arrows must be selected based on the demands of your particular bow type and draw weight so you generally want to start off with lower weights such as 350 or 400 grains and move up to heavier ones only if necessary.


This ensures that there isn’t too much pressure applied onto your limbs which could cause them to bend uncontrollably whenever the string is released, potentially leading to injury over time. It also helps avoid difficulty in holding a steady aim which will definitely degrade overall shooting performance even if you might feel like it’s not making much of a difference.


On the other hand, if you decide to start with too heavy of an arrow then there’s a risk it might damage your bow due to excess strain applied onto its limbs. This is why it’s recommended that you switch up your arrow spine depending on the current situation since even one or two pounds might make all the difference when trying to hit distant targets which require both high accuracy and speed combined for successful completion.

How does arrow weight affect penetration power?

When taking shots at game animals over long distances, your arrows must be able to penetrate through dense layers of tissue or bone in order to produce quick kills. While this is more often than not achieved through kinetic energy delivered upon impact (which can be increased by using heavier arrows), penetration power can also be enhanced through well-designed, razor-sharp arrowheads which allow the tip to cut through thick tissues with ease.

In most cases, it’s recommended that you stick to well-known brands such as Gold Tip, Easton, or Carbon Express since their products are usually made from high-quality materials and have been proven to perform exceptionally well in a variety of hunting scenarios. Furthermore, they utilize different technologies to ensure that your arrow flight remains stable and accurate over longer distances and won’t drop quickly after the initial launch (which could prevent you from hitting your target).

Do heavier arrows drop faster?

The answer to this question depends on a lot of different factors but arrow weight is definitely one of the most important components you should take into consideration. In general, it’s been found that lightweight arrows tend to drop more rapidly compared to their heavier counterparts since they are often lighter by design and have a shorter overall length which causes them to lose speed at a higher rate over longer distances. On the other hand, heavy arrows which are meant for powerful bows can still maintain supersonic flight speeds even while being launched from draw weights in excess of 70 lbs.


Of course, this doesn’t mean that lighter arrows won’t ever be able to hit targets between 60-80 yards away but you will need significantly greater accuracy levels in order for them not to drop below the sightline.


However, there’s no need to worry about this too much since longbows and recurve bows usually produce very low draw weights (between 40-50 lbs on average for hunting purposes) which means that you won’t need more than 10 or 20 grains of additional weight added onto your arrows in order to make up for this difference before hitting an 80-yard target.

Do heavier arrows fly faster?

Yes, they do. While it might seem logical that a heavier arrow would have higher kinetic energy due to its weight alone, this isn’t actually the case since velocity gains will only be marginal when simply increasing arrow mass without adjusting spine stiffness at the same time.

Instead, you should primarily focus on choosing arrows that are designed for high speeds so it’ll eventually lead to increased stability and better accuracy overall.

In addition, lightweight arrows tend to lose speed faster than their heavier counterparts due to air resistance so you’ll often find them dropping below your line of sight much sooner after launching from a high-quality bow. Keep in mind that adding more weights won’t always mean going against these laws of physics but there’s still a chance that it could drastically affect your arrow’s trajectory.

Is a heavier arrow better for hunting?

Yes, they do. While it might seem logical that a heavier arrow would have higher kinetic energy due to its weight alone, this isn’t actually the case since velocity gains will only be marginal when simply increasing arrow mass without adjusting spine stiffness at the same time.


Instead, you should primarily focus on choosing arrows that are designed for high speeds so it’ll eventually lead to increased stability and better accuracy overall.


In addition, lightweight arrows tend to lose speed faster than their heavier counterparts due to air resistance so you’ll often find them dropping below your line of sight much sooner after launching from a high-quality bow. Keep in mind that adding more weights won’t always mean going against these laws of physics but there’s still a chance that it could drastically affect your arrow’s trajectory.

How fast does a 50-pound bow shoot?

A bow’s draw weight is the amount of force required to draw an arrow out of its quiver, which means that it starts slowing down right before reaching full extension. According to industry standards, draw weights are presented in pounds, which means that a 50-pound bow will require at least 50lbs of force before it reaches optimum arrow speed.


Keep in mind that calculating an exact speed can be difficult since there are several factors influencing overall performance during every shot (e.g. humidity levels, temperature drops over time).


With this said, you’ll still be able to achieve supersonic speeds regularly with bows having a draw weight between 40-50 lbs without worrying about any major changes to spine stiffness so long as you don’t attempt to use them with too heavy arrows.

Share your love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.