Archery Butts, Clickers and Buttons

Archery Butts

Archery has been practiced for centuries, and is an addictive pastime. Modern archers use a variety of tools to help them with their sport – from bows themselves to targets and sights.


But there are also some accessories that can be used to improve your experience as well! In this blog post, we will discuss the basic components of a bow: butts, clickers, and buttons.

What are the basic components of a bow?

The main parts of any type of bow include an archery butt, archery clicker and an arrow button. These three components are the main sections of a bow that you will use every time!

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What is an archery target butt?

An archery butt is the body of your bow, which you grip onto while aiming and shooting. It has a place for an arrow to sit on top of it at all times during use – this is called the arrow rest.


An archery butt, also known as a target or shooting rest, provides the surface that supports your arrow for easy access while you take aim. The basic structure will see two planks (or ‘faces’) which are joined in the middle by a bar, and can be adjusted to create various angles. Some butts also have an adjustable height feature (otherwise known as ‘height riser’).


According to historical sources, butts refers to the training grounds for archery in medieval times. The Iberian Cave Art showcases bow and arrow combats between the early settlers of the Iberian region and their use in war. In the process of perfecting skills in this sport, you need to master specific procedures which bring us to the revelations on medieval archery highlighted below:


It took many years of training to acquire the necessary skills in using the medieval bow.


In 1252, the first law on archery made it mandatory for Englishmen between 15 and 60 to acquire bows and arrows. Later in 1363, the second archery law came into action, making it mandatory for all Englishmen to sharpen their shooting skills on Sundays.


Many residents sustained injuries due to loose arrows from uncontrolled or inexperienced archers in the process of enacting these laws. Due to this, the administration designated specific shooting areas to control cases of loose arrows. The local leadership ensured the construction of these medieval butts far from the villages on specified parcels of land.

Archery butts are among the oldest forms of training grounds in human history. The archery butts were crucial for learning hunting tactics and the foundation of the development of archery fighting techniques. For many years, archery was the most reliable skill in military training.


In many areas, archers trained tirelessly to exhibit the most profound skills in wars and hunting expeditions. The need to have the best and most efficient bow contributed to the evolution of archery butts. Archery butts did not have any unique design in the early stages as they only took up simple forms.


However, the need to create a more accurate training ground and the extensive research forced the transformation of archery butts.

Setting Up Archery Butts

Archery butts are made of concentric rings that are drawn at even distances marked between 1 and 10 with the innermost ring marked X.


In outdoor competitions, the X-ring serves as a tie-breaking determiner as the shooter that hits the X target more times garners the most points.


In indoor setups, the X-ring is the 10th ring that marks 10 points in archery.


You determine the winner in this form of archery by calculating the scores from arrows with the highest line breakers. The shooter with the highest line breakers gets the highest score.

How is an archery butt used?

The use of archery butts vary in different archery environment and also depends on the purpose of archery. Archery butts are common in different archery fields as they help determine the archery skills portrayed by the shooter. The need for practical and accurate results encourages the design of these targets in competitive and target archery.

Benefits of Using an Archery Butt

An archery butt is a device that you can attach to your bowstring before making an attempt. It will help with having all of your arrows in place while taking aim, and also allows for easier arrow collection after practice or matches.


What is an Archery Clicker?

A clicker, or draw check, makes an audible noise (click) when an archer hits his desired draw length. They are used by almost all Olympic archery shooters to achieve the precision accuracy needed to succeed in that field. They work great as a signal, or trigger, to release the arrow.

How to use a clicker for archery?

A clicker is a device that is used when you are archery shooting. It can be attached to one or both of your arms and once the arrow has been shot, it makes a clicking sound so that you know where your arrow hit on the target. The best part about using this gadget while archery shooting is that it eliminates all other noises and you can focus on your aim.

Setting up a Clicker

Step 1: Remove the clicker blade, the piece of metal that makes the noise, from the clicker. For the Crick-it clicker mine required a Phillips screwdriver.


Step 2: You want to remove the chain grommet from the clicker blade. It may require a small amount of force, but be gentle.


Step 3: Slide nylon cord through the hole where the ball chain was. As not all nylon cord is the same diameter, it may require drilling the hole to pull the cord through. You want it to be a tight fit though. 

Step 4: Using a hand lighter, singe the end of the nylon cord and extinguish it by pushing it straight down into a couple drops of water on a flat, non-combustible surface. This should leave a hard, flat collar on one end of the cord. You can test to see if the end will hold by pulling on the cord to get the blade to make the click sound.


Step 5: To silence your clicker blade you can apply heavy duty outdoor tape to the center of the blade. The more layers you apply, the quieter it will get. It is up to you how much this will be.


Step 6: Reassemble your clicker by screwing the blade back onto the plate in proper position. It is now ready to be installed on your hunting bow.


Step 7: Clean your top bow limb with denatured alcohol and a clean rag several inches below where the string separates from the bow limb. You want the clicker on the top limb so the least amount of nylon cord is used, and it stays out of the brush when moving.


Step 8: Remove the sticky backing from the clicker and press onto the center of the top bow limb with the string positioned down.


Step 9: Mark the bow string where you would like the clicker nylon string to be located so it resembles the photo.


Step 10: Unstring your bow, divide the bow string strands at the mark and insert the end of the cord through about a half inch.


Step 11: String your bow, and double check brace height and position of the cord. Sometimes the string will twist. If the cord is twisted unstring and remove the cord and insert again from the other side.


Step 12: Once the cord is straight you can adjust the length by pulling it to the correct length to click at the desired draw length. I cut off the extra leaving about ¾” of cord and burn the end (be careful here). On a Flemish twist string the cord will stay in position. On an endless loop type string you may need to serve above and below the cord to maintain position.

What are Benefits of using a clicker for archery?

A clicker helps you achieve the correct draw length for your body as well as measure both braced height and full draw length. It is adjustable depending on what you feel most comfortable with, which makes it a very important tool for archery shooting!


clickers have a dual function as both an arrow button and archery butt

they reduce wind noise, making for more accurate shots

they help center your arrows on the target, so you never miss!



What is an archery Button?

An archery button is used to prevent arrows from falling off of your bow. They’re usually attached at the end opposite of where an arrow clicker would be, but they can also have a dual function as both! Arrow buttons are small objects that go on top of your arm or wrist so you don’t lose track of where your arrows are.

How to use a button for archery?

A button is a device that you can use while archery shooting. It helps to keep your arrow in place and if it falls down then the clicker will not work properly. You need to fix this on top of your arm or wrist so that you don’t lose track of where your arrow hit on the target.

What are the different types of archery buttons and how do they work?

There are several types of archery buttons:

Wrist Button -A wrist button is a small object that goes on top of your arm or wrist so you don’t lose track of where your arrows are. They can be made out of various materials, but most people use the same one as their bow’s material.


Arm Button – An arm button is a small object that goes on top of your arm or wrist so you don’t lose track of where your arrows are. They can be made out of various materials, but most people use the same one as their bow’s material.


Bow Button – A bow button is a device attached to the end opposite of where an arrow clicker would be. It can also have a dual function as both! Bow buttons are small objects that go on top of your arm or wrist so you don’t lose track of where your arrows are. They can be made out of various materials, but most people use the same one as their bow’s material.


Cable Wrist Button – A cable wrist button is a device attached to your arm or wrist so you don’t lose track of where your arrows are. It can also have a dual function as both! Cable buttons are small objects.


Compound Bows and Recurves

Field explained that there are two classes of bows, compound bows and recurves. The string on a compound bow is threaded through a series of pulleys. These pulleys rotate off-center as the string is drawn back, changing the forces involved. Typically, this means that the initial draw requires considerable force, but once it’s fully drawn, less effort is involved in holding it there.


While there are international competitions for compound bows, Olympic competitions use what are called recurves, named “recurves” because when the bow isn’t drawn, the ends of the bow curve back in the direction the arrow will travel. This enhances the amount of force transferred to the arrow, at the cost of adding to the strain of getting and keeping the bow drawn. Unlike compound bows, recurve bows need a steadily increasing amount of force in order for the archer to pull back on the bow string.


Buttons For Recurve Bows

For recurve bows, there are two types of button devices. The first is the simple button that you attach to your bow string with a nock setter tool after fixing an arrow on the string. This device prevents fletching damage during transportation or when not in use. You can also get this type of device attached permanently to your bow string.


The second type is a button-style arrow rest, which can be attached to the outside of your riser or placed onto any existing shelf cut out on the side of your riser. This device allows you to shoot multiple types and brands of arrows without having to make additional cuts into your risers surface area for various fletchings.

Buttons For Recurve Bows

For recurve bows, there are two types of button devices. The first is the simple button that you attach to your bow string with a nock setter tool after fixing an arrow on the string. This device prevents fletching damage during transportation or when not in use. You can also get this type of device attached permanently to your bow string.


The second type is a button-style arrow rest, which can be attached to the outside of your riser or placed onto any existing shelf cut out on the side of your riser. This device allows you to shoot multiple types and brands of arrows without having to make additional cuts into your risers surface area for various fletchings.

Buttons For Compound Bows

For compound bows, there are two types of button devices. The first is the simple archery butt that you attach to your bow string with a nock setter tool after fixing an arrow on the string. This device prevents fletching damage during transportation or when not in use. You can also get this type of device attached permanently to your bow string.


The second type is a button-style arrow rest, which can be attached to the outside of your riser or placed onto any existing shelf cut out on the side of your riser. This device allows you to shoot multiple types and brands of arrows without having to make additional cuts into your risers surface area for various fletchings.

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